Understanding Addiction with Love and Compassion

Understanding addiction/substance abuse disorder is not an easy task.  Showing love and compassion to one in active addiction can be difficult.  Although often times it appears that the addict cares only about themselves it is really that they are focused predominantly on the drugs and quite honestly have very little regard for themselves.

The old way of providing treatment was perplexing as the more senior members in the field thought they held the key to recovery and everyone else should shut up and listen; ideally in total awe.  They would puff out their chest and spout in a voice that always seemed to deepen by a few octaves, “they can’t get over on me.”  Catching people became a claim to fame that appeared to be symbolic of putting another notch on the counselor’s belt.  In all reality this only served to up the game which is often times as addictive as the substances themselves.  For years addiction was an interesting dichotomy of confrontation and love, “tough love.”  If you demonstrated kindness it was considered “enabling” and if you didn’t brutally point out the error of the addict’s ways you were not breaking through their denial. 












Thankfully the field is changing and kindness is considered a virtue rather than a hindrance.  We have learned that gently “developing discrepancies” while empowering those impacted by the disease allows the addict to move beyond the guilt and shame finding value in themselves.  This provides an opportunity to make major life changes.   

Helping others find their way out is a privilege that those of us who work in this field have the honor of doing.  To treat those we serve with compassion, dignity and respect lies at the core of what we do.  We believe in holistic treatment where all aspects of one’s life negatively impacted by the disease has a chance to heal.   Our intent is to gently guide our people as we partner with them on their totally life changing journey.   

When looking for a treatment program it is important that the program fits one’s needs. Our world believes in a quick fix and advocates taking a medication to fix everything.  We want to get the fastest results with the least amount of work.  Unfortunately this is not always the best approach when treating addiction/substance use disorder. Medication can be a crucial adjunct to treatment.  It is through treatment that one is able to make changes in all areas of their life creating a framework necessary for long term recovery.  This tends to be the hardest but most rewarding part about recovery.  Mastering the ability to be able to look at oneself and make changes in one’s life is key to sobriety.

Lu Carson, R.N., C.A.R.N.., L.S.W.
Executive Vice President
November 21, 2017






Addiction is a disease and addicts deserve to be treated with kindness, dignity and respect 
We are in the midst of a tragic epidemic plowing through our communities. Comparable to a tornado it spins out of control with the sound of a freight train; touching down randomly while leaving behind trails of devastation. 

No matter what your belief system it has to be evident that addiction is impacting people everywhere.  Addiction touches the lives of not only the addict but all of those in the addict’s life.  Even if you feel you have no personal experience with addiction it still impacts you.  Like it or not an addict could be anyone you have had contact with in your life.  Addiction is an equal opportunity condition.  It does not discriminate based on age, race, gender, sexual orientation, educational background, religious affiliation or employment status.    

Fueled by our belief that addiction is a disease and addicts are good people who deserve to be treated with kindness, dignity and respect State Line provides treatment by embracing, empowering and helping recovering addicts find their purpose.

To help advocate for the people we have the privilege to serve as well as provide definition to the treatment we provide we will be reviewing the following article in segments.  
Executive Vice President
Lu Carson, R.N., C.A.R.N.., L.S.W.


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It’s Time to Stop Kicking People Out of Addiction Treatment " 

(Written by William L. White, MA, Christy K. Scott, PhD, Michael L. Dennis, PhD. And Michael G. Boyle, MA).

This is excellent and we recommend reading.


______________________________________________________________________________


Currently, addiction affects 23.2 million Americans — of whom only about 10% are receiving the treatment they need.

What an incredibly staggering piece of information.  Addiction is a deadly disease that impacts 23.2 million people. And that number is only tracking Americans.  The irony is that addiction targets good people who will struggle with a chronic disease that severely impacts not only them but also their family, friends, employers, teachers, customers...  The list of those affected goes on and on.  

And yet there are still so many who choose to view this disease as a character defect. Hard to imagine with all the information about addiction that there are those who do not believe it to be the devastating disease it is. 

“Addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease. Brain imaging shows that addiction severely alters brain areas critical to decision-making, learning and memory, and behavior control, which may help to explain the compulsive and destructive behaviors of addiction.”

 Nowhere else in the health care industry do we look at those diagnosed with a disease as bad people deserving of their fate.  Yet with addiction sadly there are those who still believe it is a choice; something someone has done to themselves.

It is time to lose the judgment, usually fueled by fear, and embrace addiction for what it truly is.  The sooner we take the SHAME out of this horrific disease the sooner we can increase that 10% to a much higher number.   Then those impacted by addiction will be able to start to get what they truly deserve, a life well lived. 

Executive Vice President
Lu Carson, R.N., C.A.R.N.., L.S.W.



Addiction is a disease and addicts deserve to be treated with kindness, dignity and respect
NYTimes: Drug Linked to Ohio Overdoses Can Kill in Doses Smaller than a Snowflake
September 7, 2016 
The recent influx of overdoses in our area has been yet another nightmarish reminder of how devastating the disease of addiction really is.  

In response to this brutal reality State Line posted signs in an attempt to reach out to people who were either suffering from the disease of opioid  addiction or knew someone who was.  Our hope was to offer options to people whether through our program or help them find another program that might better suit their needs.
 
Surprisingly a number of people from various communities notified us that they had removed our signs.  
 
People are using opioids at the risk of overdosing and possible death, utilizing not just heroin but fentanyl and carfentanil as well.  
 
Jim Neil, Hamilton County Sheriff, was just interviewed on the evening news.  He made a comment indicating "we cannot arrest ourselves out of this." What an insightful and powerful statement.  Responding to addiction must be through treatment not punishment.  
 
Be part of the solution.  Lets all take responsibility to get the word out.   We can help people heal by giving them safe options and the support they need to seek treatment. 
Executive Vice President
Lu Carson, R.N., C.A.R.N.., L.S.W.

Link to NY Times September 5th article


We are in the midst of a tragic epidemic plowing through our communities. Comparable to a tornado it spins out of control with the sound of a freight train; touching down randomly while leaving behind trails of devastation. 

No matter what your belief system it has to be evident that addiction is impacting people everywhere.  Addiction touches the lives of not only the addict but all of those in the addict’s life.  Even if you feel you have no personal experience with addiction it still impacts you.  Like it or not an addict could be anyone you have had contact with in your life.  Addiction is an equal opportunity condition.  It does not discriminate based on age, race, gender, sexual orientation, educational background, religious affiliation or employment status.    

Fueled by our belief that addiction is a disease and addicts are good people who deserve to be treated with kindness, dignity and respect State Line provides treatment by embracing, empowering and helping recovering addicts find their purpose.

To help advocate for the people we have the privilege to serve as well as provide definition to the treatment we provide we will be reviewing the following article in segments.  

“It’s Time to Stop Kicking People Out of Addiction Treatment "
(Written by William L. White, MA, Christy K. Scott, PhD, Michael L. Dennis, PhD. And Michael G. Boyle, MA).

If you are as moved by this as we are please look for the reviews and of course we would love for you to like and share.
Executive Vice President

Lu Carson, R.N., C.A.R.N.., L.S.W.

Currently, addiction affects 23.2 million Americans — of whom only about 10% are receiving the treatment they need.

What an incredibly staggering piece of information.  Addiction is a deadly disease that impacts 23.2 million people. And that number is only tracking Americans.  The irony is that addiction targets good people who will struggle with a chronic disease that severely impacts not only them but also their family, friends, employers, teachers, customers...  The list of those affected goes on and on.  

And yet there are still so many who choose to view this disease as a character defect. Hard to imagine with all the information about addiction that there are those who do not believe it to be the devastating disease it is. 

“Addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease. Brain imaging shows that addiction severely alters brain areas critical to decision-making, learning and memory, and behavior control, which may help to explain the compulsive and destructive behaviors of addiction.”

 Nowhere else in the health care industry do we look at those diagnosed with a disease as bad people deserving of their fate.  Yet with addiction sadly there are those who still believe it is a choice; something someone has done to themselves.

It is time to lose the judgment, usually fueled by fear, and embrace addiction for what it truly is.  The sooner we take the SHAME out of this horrific disease the sooner we can increase that 10% to a much higher number.   Then those impacted by addiction will be able to start to get what they truly deserve, a life well lived.

Executive Vice President
Lu Carson, R.N., C.A.R.N.., L.S.W.

Addiction is a disease and addicts deserve to be treated with kindness, dignity and respect

State Line Treatment Services